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The most innovative studies

MISSION

We are creating a unique project that aims to meet human needs in an optimal, environmentally sustainable way.

Our principle is the 3Rs: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

While striving for beauty, we do not forget perfection, and perfection for us is above all harmony in man’s relationship with the world around him. We want to teach you how to consume wisely and consciously without becoming a victim of fashion, and how to use goods and services ethically without imposing the role of victim on others.

We believe that the future designers, the graduates of our school, with the above values at heart, can make this world a better place, and together we will become those who create change.

VISION

What will be left behind?
We are not afraid to dream and set goals! Moving in small steps, we aim to create something meaningful and great – a whole generation of future designers who will design everything from everyday objects to buildings, cities and landscapes, without forgetting to protect the environment.
So what is Sustainable Design? It is the answer to mass production, which is harmful to the environment and pays no attention to people’s real needs!

Ecological design not only transforms the world around us, but also helps us to rethink the role humans play in relation to nature.

Our vision is a better world, an awareness of every breath and movement, a recognition of the value of everything that lives!

For whom?

It doesn’t matter to us whether you have an artistic background or experience in design or not. What matters is your good energy and belief that through sustainable design we can change the world together!

Your language is creativity, empathy, compassion? You realise that when producing a product or providing a service, it is important to think about what is behind it? The claim that production should be ethical speaks to your heart?
Then together we can find an application for your skills!

The European School of Sustainable Design is the answer to a passion for design, a desire to gain real practice and to participate in the search for sustainable solutions for our planet.

Interested

Sustainable Fashion Design

Design

You strive to change the world around you for a more beautiful and perfect world.

Sustainable Fashion Design

Ecology

You want to express yourself not only through creativity, but also through sensitivity and real action for the planet.

Sustainable Fashion Design

Fashion

You aspire to conformity of forms and colours, to achieve a balance between unity and diversity, order and chaos.

Sustainable Fashion Design

Harmony

You tend to create your own order of things, guided by the idea of visual balance.

Sustainable Fashion Design

Ethics

You reflect on the human contribution to any work, are against exploitation and oppose the use of animals in the fashion industry

quote left

What attracts me most about fashion is that it is a reflection of our time. You have to participate in it, you have to witness your own moment, you should observe closely what is happening around it

Nicolas Ghesquiere
quote right

What
you will learn ?

Look for inspiration and ideas in a wide variety of places – travel, see exhibitions, learn about culture and traditions, meet new people, change the world with us!

Who are the
fashion graduates

Sustainable Fashion Design

Sustainable
Fashion Designer

A fashion designer is an artist, tailor, stylist and service provider in one. He creates clothes, accessories and footwear – from the idea to the finished product. The fashion designer is sensitive to colour, light and, of course, beauty. The fashion designer does not necessarily know how to sew, but he knows the properties of fabrics.

The Fashion Designer, who works independently, is familiar with the principles of marketing, advertising and PR, – he is not only the creator but also the manager of his brand.

A sustainable fashion designer, on the other hand, is a designer whose aforementioned activities are also aimed at protecting the environment. They are representatives of slow fashion – clothes are designed and produced to last for many years, not just one season.

Sustainable Fashion Design

Stylist

Like the fairy in Cinderella, the stylist brings out the strongest features of a person’s appearance and personality and highlights them in the best possible way. From the most comfortable everyday looks to the most extravagant stage looks, for example for films, videos and photo shoots, the stylist is the personal assistant who brings out the strongest features of a person’s appearance and personality.

A stylist is a personal assistant who guides and supports people in solving many problems related to style and self-expression.

Among the stylist’s services: shopping, wardrobe structuring, image creation: everyday, stage, etc. The stylist can work with the client not only on their wardrobe, hairstyle and make-up, but also on their posture and facial expressions.

Sustainable Fashion Design

Influencer
Fashion blogger

This is an opinion leader around whom a loyal audience gathers. More often than not, the influencer is also a blogger and connects with their audience through social media – Instagram, YouTube, TikTok.

Fashion bloggers specialise in style and trend content. They most often promote clothing and accessory brands.

A fashion influencer is someone they look up to, someone who can often research and even create fashion trends.

Sustainable Fashion Design

Trendsetter

Trendsetters in fashion are certainly unique individuals. They are innovators who are role models. Such people are the first to pick up new trends and incorporate them into everyday life. They are people who do something they love in life, which brings positive results for themselves and others.

In order to become a trendsetter, you have to follow fashion and therefore be aware of all new trends. Meanwhile, fashion is not only an art, but also a business. So trendsetters are people who influence other people’s purchasing decisions and consumption behaviour.

You certainly associate them, they appear on TV, they are well-known, active on social media, they know what they are doing and you want to be like them!

Sustainable Fashion Design

Graphic designer
for clothing prints

This is someone who designs graphics for garments and accessories in a variety of techniques, is proficient with graphics programs, participates in the creation of collections – looks for inspiration, collaborates with designers when creating garment models.

This is someone who takes part in collection reviews, verifies the designed graphics from a quality and visual point of view.

The creators of prints look for inspiration by going to other countries, they look mainly at what the street is wearing, they analyse the competition.

Sustainable Fashion Design Sustainable Fashion Design

Open
Days





    OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS OPEN DAYS

    Program
    of studies

    3

    Years

    (6 semesters)

    180

    ECTS credits

    (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System)

    BACHELOR'S DEGREE

    FIRST CYCLE STUDIES

    FIRST
    YEAR OF STUDY

    Starting from the first year, the programme includes a series of practical classes whose main objective is to equip students with the basic workshop skills necessary to design and create their own dream artistic concepts. The first year also includes a block of classes devoted to CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) and sustainable development in fashion, the aim of which is to build awareness of the specific mission of fashion designers to save the environment.

    SECOND
    YEAR OF STUDY

    The second year of studies is a continuation of the practical classes started earlier, which develop the students’ workshop skills. From the second year, the curriculum also includes classes designed to familiarise students with the use of computer programmes in the work of fashion designers. From the fourth semester, the curriculum includes work placements according to the two pathways available to students, i.e. fashion design and sustainable fashion management.

    THIRD
    YEAR OF STUDY

    In the third year the study programme includes a number of classes oriented towards the possibility of pursuing one’s own professional activity in the fashion industry. From the fifth semester of study, the student proceeds to prepare his/her own social project, which in the fashion design and sustainable fashion management course replaces the obligation to prepare a thesis.

    Tuition fees

    FIXED TUITION
    – FLEXIBLE PAYMENTS

    By choosing to study at UEHS, you can be sure that the tuition fee will not change throughout the duration of your studies. You can pay the tuition fee once for the entire year of study or spread over a semester payment. This allows you to decide how you want to plan your expenses

    PROMOTIONAL PRICES

    ANNUALLY

    4000
    EUROS

    PER SEMESTER*

    2150
    EUROS

    REGULAR PRICES

    ANNUALLY

    5000
    EUROS

    PER SEMESTER*

    2650
    EUROS

    CAMPUS

    A nature-friendly
    campus

    Vizja Park is a place created with nature in mind from the beginning. It is an allergy-friendly place, but also a planet-friendly place. There are recycling bins and water drinkers on every floor – just bring your own bottle or cup and you can eliminate plastic from your everyday life. In total, there are 26 water drinkers on campus. The building is equipped with energy-saving systems – the lighting in the halls is synchronised with motion sensors. The same applies to the toilets, where the washbasins are also equipped with sensor taps.

    Access
    for everyone

    The building is adapted to the needs of people with disabilities and is also friendly to mothers with children. The building also has a modern, self-service cloakroom that is accessible to students. All that is needed to use it is a student ID card or a building access card. A two-storey library with three quiet study rooms is available to students.

    The ideal
    place for a student

    Lecture and exercise rooms are equipped with ergonomic furniture to ensure a comfortable position during classes. The spacious corridors have wall niches with comfortable seating and accessible sockets – you can sit with a book and freely charge your phone or laptop.

    If sport
    is your passion

    Vizja Park is also a place that encourages physical development – there is a full-size sports hall with the possibility of being divided into 3 sectors. Choose from football, basketball and volleyball classes. The hall is equipped with a climbing wall with a three-track difficulty level, as well as a gymnasium and ballet room. Learn, develop and get healthy with us!

    BLOG

    There is no longer an alternative for sustainable fashion: Polish woman wins Kering Sustainable Awards

    “For me, rubbish doesn’t exist! They are materials, not rubbish. We don’t really have a problem with the waste itself, only that we consider it useless. We don’t know how to use their potential. I found a certified recycling place in India. India is the largest producer of electronic waste in the world. I did an analysis of what losses we are incurring by engaging in traditional metal mining, and what benefits could come from shifting our operations to the mountains of metal junk we have created ourselves. The potential is overwhelming!”, – comments designer Aniela Fidler for Vogue.co.uk on her participation in the Kering Sustainable Awards.

    At the age of 22, the girl left Poland, worked for six months, then went to university at the London College of Fashion, having chosen shoemaking, – a traditional craft for which the UK is world-famous.

    In 2018, she achieved huge success in the fashion world! She became the winner of the fourth Kering Sustainable Awards in the Innovation category.

    Ten thousand EUROs were earmarked for the development and implementation of the competition project into reality.

    Aniela is confident that ecology is fashion’s biggest challenge. “We are great at making beautiful things. We have the aesthetics mastered, worse the ethics. We need to rethink what we consider fashionable and beautiful. And whether fast fashion really falls into these categories. In my opinion, the truly valuable clothes are those that we are proud of both their appearance and their history,” she explains.

    Currently, Aniela is researching how people communicate values, ideas and emotions through what they wear. She aims to understand what a sense of fulfillment is and how to achieve it, and how to project a fulfilling future. Her main interest at the moment is the impact of emotions on the permanence of an object. Aniela analyses how different environments, people, emotions, objects and materials come together in the stories we tell ourselves.

    You can read more about Aniela Fidler at this link.

    10 steps to creating a sustainable wardrobe

    Sustainability in fashion is a concept that aims to motivate people to be more conscious about the decisions they make to reduce the negative impact of the fashion industry on the planet.

    The 10 steps to creating a sustainable wardrobe are described by Greener Ideal. What can you do?

    1. Organise your wardrobe

    Clean everything out and start sorting. Carefully analyse and separate them into three different piles: leave behind, sell, donate.

    Check the labels for materials and leave those that are made of natural fabrics, such as linen or organic cotton.

    1. Change your current shopping habits

    Changing your perspective from ‘I want’ to ‘I need’ will help you curb impulsive purchases and ensure you only buy things you need. People generally think that they shouldn’t spend a lot of money on everyday items, such as jeans, for example. Instead, they spend more money on things they rarely wear, such as shoes or clothes for special occasions. In fact, it should be the other way around.

    1. Check before you buy

    Look for as much information as possible about each brand. Information such as what fabrics they use, where they are produced and whether they use sustainable packaging is important!

    1. Make a list of your favourite environmentally conscious brands

    Narrow down your list of sustainable brands to a few favourites. Think about which ones best fit your style and budget, then write them down on your list. Always check your list before buying new items.

    1. Look for eco-friendly fabrics

    There are several non-toxic fabrics to look for when shopping: organic cotton, linen, leather, wool, hemp, silk. Non-organic cotton is unfortunately sprayed with pesticides.

    1. Buy timeless items

    Creating an ethical wardrobe means simplifying your arsenal of clothes and accessories to a few trusted items.

    Basic T-shirts, the obligatory good pair of jeans, classic dresses or timeless coats can be easily mixed and matched to create several different looks. Choose items that will easily transition from summer to winter.

    1. Take care of your clothes

    There’s no point investing in good quality items if you don’t take care of them. This means that before you run the washing machine, check the instructions on the labels. Try to dry your laundry on a hanger rather than in the dryer, so your clothes will last longer.

    1. Donate and resell

    Give a second life to your old clothes by reselling or donating what you no longer need. This way you can make sure they don’t end up in landfills.

    1. Repair your clothes

    Instead of buying a new item every time the zip on your favourite jacket breaks, take it to a tailor and have it repaired or learn to do it yourself.

    1. Borrow expensive items

    Borrowing expensive items is not only a good way to reduce fashion’s negative impact on the environment, it also saves money. It’s a win-win situation for both parties.

    The real cost of fast fashion. Cheap brands are flooding the world

    Fashion trends come and go at breakneck speed, and with them t-shirts, jeans, tops, coats, jumpers. Hype shot in front of social media, influencers, advertising campaigns of big brands encourage consumers to change their wardrobe more and more often. And, importantly, inexpensive ones.

    The fast fashion industry responds rapidly to new trends and consumer needs, providing inexpensive and easily accessible clothing. Global fast fashion brands produce up to 50 collections a year!

    What is the cost of fast fashion? Accessibility, low price, wide choice are all advantages of fast fashion, one it carries serious consequences, especially for the environment. Activists and environmentalists have been sounding the alarm for years.

    The textile industry is mainly based on the production of cotton. Looking at the popularity of synthetic materials, one would think that such a product is environmentally friendly. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Cotton production is extremely water-intensive. Up to 30,000 litres of water are used per kilogram of cotton. Fast fashion is largely responsible for the presence of micro-plastics in the oceans from the manufacture of synthetic materials. The long supply chain of cheap fashion, from cultivation, to fibre production, to sewing, to dyeing, taking place in different parts of the world, produces a huge carbon footprint. Outdated and worn-out clothes also have to be stored somewhere. More often than not, they end up in landfills, accumulating waste, of which a small proportion (about 12 percent) will be recycled.

    Ethical issues cannot be forgotten either. In factories in Bangladesh, working women earn approx. 30 cents per hour. Working conditions are also difficult, not least through contact with the dyes used to dye the fabrics, which can have carcinogenic effects. Sewage from the production of clothes pollutes nearby rivers, causing all biological life to disappear and negatively affecting the lives of the people there….

    We live in a world where novelty chases novelty. We want more and better. We are easily bored. Stuff is a status indicator. But widespread consumerism is eating away at our planet at an alarming rate. And we don’t have another one…

    It’s definitely time to change that!

    Source: Money.pl

    Clothes from a 3D printer: do you want one, I’ll print you a dress?

    The clothing industry produces more than 2.1 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases each year, more than the entire economies of France, Germany and the UK combined. Scary figures, right? However, there are technologies that can play an important role in solving the fashion waste problem. We propose to talk about 3D printing?

    Clothing design

    The use of 3D technology in the design process can significantly reduce environmental pollution at the initial stage of garment design. In the traditional garment design process, an average of four to five physical samples are created before a brand approves the desired product. Because these samples are semi-finished or inaccurate, they are usually incinerated or taken to landfill at the end. Unlike the labour-intensive and environmentally damaging sampling process, 3D garment prototyping eliminates sample waste at the pre-production stage. All edits and changes can be carried out virtually, without cutting fabric or generating waste.

    Fabric sampling

    It is difficult to calculate the amount of fabric wasted at the material sourcing stage because garment companies do not record the amount of waste for fear of criticism, which indirectly proves that the amount of wasted samples is huge.

    Thanks to the development of digital materials, 3D technology in the garment industry makes it possible for fabric and material suppliers to present samples digitally and reduce material waste.

    Selling products

    Digital clothing technology means shorter time to market and faster garment development, giving designers more time to work on optimising style. Photorealistic 3D images of garments instead of their traditional counterparts is more than just a money-saver for brands, who don’t have to take photos. With 3D digital body modelling, shoppers can virtually try the digital garment on their own silhouette to see if it fits the garment. 3D clothing technology is effectively transforming the current model of clothing sales from a production-sales process to an ‘on-demand’ process, where consumers browse virtual 3D clothing online, place orders and pre-pay, and then brands organise production according to the size of the order.

    Perhaps this is the future of fashion?

    Source: Medium.com

    Animals on fur – condemned in the name of fashion. We can change that!

    In the 20th century, fur was synonymous with luxury, money and social standing. The position of these ‘luxury goods’ seemed extremely strong for decades. Fortunately, however, animal rights activists emerged, for whom animal fur is a symbol of barbarism and lack of empathy.

    Despite the change in perception of this garment, are animals for fur no longer being raised on a mass scale?

    Certainly, the good news is coming from the big fashion industry, with more fashion houses pledging to give up animal fur and exotic animal skins. The latest high-profile brand to take this step is the fashion house Chanel, which refrained for a very long time from eliminating fur products in its collections.

    Why did it take so long?

    Animal fur used to be able to cost a fortune. Mink or chinchilla fur was a breath of luxury that a woman on a middle income could not afford. Thus, furs came to be associated with the social elite and a high position of wealth. Fur in the form of an outer garment, in the form of a shawl or a glove or handbag decoration was mass-produced throughout almost the entire 20th century. What the cost of this production was has only come to light relatively recently, hence the slow progressive change.

    This cost is approximately 35. animals to sew one coat. Before they are killed, however, animals raised for fur are kept in extremely despicable conditions where they live on the brink of survival.

    For this luxury, the customer pays a much higher price than just what appears on the label. The fate of future animals rests in his or her hands, as the lack of demand has the effect of reducing production and limiting the senseless deaths of hundreds of thousands of animals.

    This price we have had to pay for decades of wanton and brutal killing of animals has forced some countries to take rational and concrete steps. Today, countries such as the Netherlands, Norway, Serbia, Luxembourg, Slovenia, Croatia, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Japan, the United Kingdom, Austria, Belgium, India, New Zealand and some states of the United States have introduced a total ban on the rearing of animals for fur production.

    While the number of these progressive countries seems sizable, it is worth remembering that there are 195 countries in the world, so the sad statistic speaks for itself and lets us know that globally we still have a long way to go on this issue.

    Source: Zoo Art Blog

    The ocean and fashion: what is worth bearing in mind?

    Oceans – full of life, beauty and plastic…

    We buy things, wash them, throw them away and buy new ones. We like to look pretty and fashionable. We also love to travel, relax by the ocean and swim. But what do fashion and the ocean have in common? What is worth bearing in mind when creating demand for an increasing number of clothes?

    Let’s take a closer look at some facts.

    Washing clothes releases tonnes of microfibres into the ocean, the equivalent of billions of plastic bottles. Many of these fibres are polyester, a plastic found in around 60 per cent of garments.

    A 2017 report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) stated that 35 per cent of all microplastics – very small pieces of plastic that never biodegrade – found in the ocean come from washing synthetic fabrics such as polyester.

    But when we buy new clothes that are not of the highest quality and wash them, are we thinking about the fate of the oceans and their inhabitants?

    The apparel industry is also the second largest consumer of water in the world.

    This is data from the World Resources Institute (WRI). It takes about 2,600 litres of water to produce one cotton shirt. This is enough for one person to drink at least eight cups of water a day for three and a half years.

    It takes even more to produce a pair of jeans – more than 7,500 litres of water. This is more than one person will drink for 10 years, consuming eight cups each day. 

    This is because both jeans and shirts are usually made from cotton, and it takes a lot of water to grow cotton. 

    The clothing industry also affects water purity

    Fabric dyeing is the second largest source of water pollution in the world, as the residue from the process is often dumped into ditches, streams or rivers. The dyeing process uses enough water to fill 2 million Olympic swimming pools each year….

    The list could go on, and water is just one of the factors that deteriorate as a result of our daily purchasing habits, which are not always thoughtful and conscious.

    The important thing here is to realise that changing them has the power to change the world. You can start today.


    Source:
    Business Insider

    There is no longer an alternative for sustainable fashion: Polish woman wins Kering Sustainable Awards

    more

    There is no longer an alternative for sustainable fashion: Polish woman wins Kering Sustainable Awards

    “For me, rubbish doesn’t exist! They are materials, not rubbish. We don’t really have a problem with the waste itself, only that we consider it useless. We don’t know how to use their potential. I found a certified recycling place in India. India is the largest producer of electronic waste in the world. I did an analysis of what losses we are incurring by engaging in traditional metal mining, and what benefits could come from shifting our operations to the mountains of metal junk we have created ourselves. The potential is overwhelming!”, – comments designer Aniela Fidler for Vogue.co.uk on her participation in the Kering Sustainable Awards.

    At the age of 22, the girl left Poland, worked for six months, then went to university at the London College of Fashion, having chosen shoemaking, – a traditional craft for which the UK is world-famous.

    In 2018, she achieved huge success in the fashion world! She became the winner of the fourth Kering Sustainable Awards in the Innovation category.

    Ten thousand EUROs were earmarked for the development and implementation of the competition project into reality.

    Aniela is confident that ecology is fashion’s biggest challenge. “We are great at making beautiful things. We have the aesthetics mastered, worse the ethics. We need to rethink what we consider fashionable and beautiful. And whether fast fashion really falls into these categories. In my opinion, the truly valuable clothes are those that we are proud of both their appearance and their history,” she explains.

    Currently, Aniela is researching how people communicate values, ideas and emotions through what they wear. She aims to understand what a sense of fulfillment is and how to achieve it, and how to project a fulfilling future. Her main interest at the moment is the impact of emotions on the permanence of an object. Aniela analyses how different environments, people, emotions, objects and materials come together in the stories we tell ourselves.

    You can read more about Aniela Fidler at this link.

    10 steps to creating a sustainable wardrobe

    more

    10 steps to creating a sustainable wardrobe

    Sustainability in fashion is a concept that aims to motivate people to be more conscious about the decisions they make to reduce the negative impact of the fashion industry on the planet.

    The 10 steps to creating a sustainable wardrobe are described by Greener Ideal. What can you do?

    1. Organise your wardrobe

    Clean everything out and start sorting. Carefully analyse and separate them into three different piles: leave behind, sell, donate.

    Check the labels for materials and leave those that are made of natural fabrics, such as linen or organic cotton.

    1. Change your current shopping habits

    Changing your perspective from ‘I want’ to ‘I need’ will help you curb impulsive purchases and ensure you only buy things you need. People generally think that they shouldn’t spend a lot of money on everyday items, such as jeans, for example. Instead, they spend more money on things they rarely wear, such as shoes or clothes for special occasions. In fact, it should be the other way around.

    1. Check before you buy

    Look for as much information as possible about each brand. Information such as what fabrics they use, where they are produced and whether they use sustainable packaging is important!

    1. Make a list of your favourite environmentally conscious brands

    Narrow down your list of sustainable brands to a few favourites. Think about which ones best fit your style and budget, then write them down on your list. Always check your list before buying new items.

    1. Look for eco-friendly fabrics

    There are several non-toxic fabrics to look for when shopping: organic cotton, linen, leather, wool, hemp, silk. Non-organic cotton is unfortunately sprayed with pesticides.

    1. Buy timeless items

    Creating an ethical wardrobe means simplifying your arsenal of clothes and accessories to a few trusted items.

    Basic T-shirts, the obligatory good pair of jeans, classic dresses or timeless coats can be easily mixed and matched to create several different looks. Choose items that will easily transition from summer to winter.

    1. Take care of your clothes

    There’s no point investing in good quality items if you don’t take care of them. This means that before you run the washing machine, check the instructions on the labels. Try to dry your laundry on a hanger rather than in the dryer, so your clothes will last longer.

    1. Donate and resell

    Give a second life to your old clothes by reselling or donating what you no longer need. This way you can make sure they don’t end up in landfills.

    1. Repair your clothes

    Instead of buying a new item every time the zip on your favourite jacket breaks, take it to a tailor and have it repaired or learn to do it yourself.

    1. Borrow expensive items

    Borrowing expensive items is not only a good way to reduce fashion’s negative impact on the environment, it also saves money. It’s a win-win situation for both parties.

    The real cost of fast fashion. Cheap brands are flooding the world

    more

    The real cost of fast fashion. Cheap brands are flooding the world

    Fashion trends come and go at breakneck speed, and with them t-shirts, jeans, tops, coats, jumpers. Hype shot in front of social media, influencers, advertising campaigns of big brands encourage consumers to change their wardrobe more and more often. And, importantly, inexpensive ones.

    The fast fashion industry responds rapidly to new trends and consumer needs, providing inexpensive and easily accessible clothing. Global fast fashion brands produce up to 50 collections a year!

    What is the cost of fast fashion? Accessibility, low price, wide choice are all advantages of fast fashion, one it carries serious consequences, especially for the environment. Activists and environmentalists have been sounding the alarm for years.

    The textile industry is mainly based on the production of cotton. Looking at the popularity of synthetic materials, one would think that such a product is environmentally friendly. Unfortunately, this is not the case. Cotton production is extremely water-intensive. Up to 30,000 litres of water are used per kilogram of cotton. Fast fashion is largely responsible for the presence of micro-plastics in the oceans from the manufacture of synthetic materials. The long supply chain of cheap fashion, from cultivation, to fibre production, to sewing, to dyeing, taking place in different parts of the world, produces a huge carbon footprint. Outdated and worn-out clothes also have to be stored somewhere. More often than not, they end up in landfills, accumulating waste, of which a small proportion (about 12 percent) will be recycled.

    Ethical issues cannot be forgotten either. In factories in Bangladesh, working women earn approx. 30 cents per hour. Working conditions are also difficult, not least through contact with the dyes used to dye the fabrics, which can have carcinogenic effects. Sewage from the production of clothes pollutes nearby rivers, causing all biological life to disappear and negatively affecting the lives of the people there….

    We live in a world where novelty chases novelty. We want more and better. We are easily bored. Stuff is a status indicator. But widespread consumerism is eating away at our planet at an alarming rate. And we don’t have another one…

    It’s definitely time to change that!

    Source: Money.pl

    Clothes from a 3D printer: do you want one, I’ll print you a dress?

    more

    Clothes from a 3D printer: do you want one, I’ll print you a dress?

    The clothing industry produces more than 2.1 billion tonnes of greenhouse gases each year, more than the entire economies of France, Germany and the UK combined. Scary figures, right? However, there are technologies that can play an important role in solving the fashion waste problem. We propose to talk about 3D printing?

    Clothing design

    The use of 3D technology in the design process can significantly reduce environmental pollution at the initial stage of garment design. In the traditional garment design process, an average of four to five physical samples are created before a brand approves the desired product. Because these samples are semi-finished or inaccurate, they are usually incinerated or taken to landfill at the end. Unlike the labour-intensive and environmentally damaging sampling process, 3D garment prototyping eliminates sample waste at the pre-production stage. All edits and changes can be carried out virtually, without cutting fabric or generating waste.

    Fabric sampling

    It is difficult to calculate the amount of fabric wasted at the material sourcing stage because garment companies do not record the amount of waste for fear of criticism, which indirectly proves that the amount of wasted samples is huge.

    Thanks to the development of digital materials, 3D technology in the garment industry makes it possible for fabric and material suppliers to present samples digitally and reduce material waste.

    Selling products

    Digital clothing technology means shorter time to market and faster garment development, giving designers more time to work on optimising style. Photorealistic 3D images of garments instead of their traditional counterparts is more than just a money-saver for brands, who don’t have to take photos. With 3D digital body modelling, shoppers can virtually try the digital garment on their own silhouette to see if it fits the garment. 3D clothing technology is effectively transforming the current model of clothing sales from a production-sales process to an ‘on-demand’ process, where consumers browse virtual 3D clothing online, place orders and pre-pay, and then brands organise production according to the size of the order.

    Perhaps this is the future of fashion?

    Source: Medium.com

    Animals on fur – condemned in the name of fashion. We can change that!

    more

    Animals on fur – condemned in the name of fashion. We can change that!

    In the 20th century, fur was synonymous with luxury, money and social standing. The position of these ‘luxury goods’ seemed extremely strong for decades. Fortunately, however, animal rights activists emerged, for whom animal fur is a symbol of barbarism and lack of empathy.

    Despite the change in perception of this garment, are animals for fur no longer being raised on a mass scale?

    Certainly, the good news is coming from the big fashion industry, with more fashion houses pledging to give up animal fur and exotic animal skins. The latest high-profile brand to take this step is the fashion house Chanel, which refrained for a very long time from eliminating fur products in its collections.

    Why did it take so long?

    Animal fur used to be able to cost a fortune. Mink or chinchilla fur was a breath of luxury that a woman on a middle income could not afford. Thus, furs came to be associated with the social elite and a high position of wealth. Fur in the form of an outer garment, in the form of a shawl or a glove or handbag decoration was mass-produced throughout almost the entire 20th century. What the cost of this production was has only come to light relatively recently, hence the slow progressive change.

    This cost is approximately 35. animals to sew one coat. Before they are killed, however, animals raised for fur are kept in extremely despicable conditions where they live on the brink of survival.

    For this luxury, the customer pays a much higher price than just what appears on the label. The fate of future animals rests in his or her hands, as the lack of demand has the effect of reducing production and limiting the senseless deaths of hundreds of thousands of animals.

    This price we have had to pay for decades of wanton and brutal killing of animals has forced some countries to take rational and concrete steps. Today, countries such as the Netherlands, Norway, Serbia, Luxembourg, Slovenia, Croatia, Macedonia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Japan, the United Kingdom, Austria, Belgium, India, New Zealand and some states of the United States have introduced a total ban on the rearing of animals for fur production.

    While the number of these progressive countries seems sizable, it is worth remembering that there are 195 countries in the world, so the sad statistic speaks for itself and lets us know that globally we still have a long way to go on this issue.

    Source: Zoo Art Blog

    The ocean and fashion: what is worth bearing in mind?

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    The ocean and fashion: what is worth bearing in mind?

    Oceans – full of life, beauty and plastic…

    We buy things, wash them, throw them away and buy new ones. We like to look pretty and fashionable. We also love to travel, relax by the ocean and swim. But what do fashion and the ocean have in common? What is worth bearing in mind when creating demand for an increasing number of clothes?

    Let’s take a closer look at some facts.

    Washing clothes releases tonnes of microfibres into the ocean, the equivalent of billions of plastic bottles. Many of these fibres are polyester, a plastic found in around 60 per cent of garments.

    A 2017 report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) stated that 35 per cent of all microplastics – very small pieces of plastic that never biodegrade – found in the ocean come from washing synthetic fabrics such as polyester.

    But when we buy new clothes that are not of the highest quality and wash them, are we thinking about the fate of the oceans and their inhabitants?

    The apparel industry is also the second largest consumer of water in the world.

    This is data from the World Resources Institute (WRI). It takes about 2,600 litres of water to produce one cotton shirt. This is enough for one person to drink at least eight cups of water a day for three and a half years.

    It takes even more to produce a pair of jeans – more than 7,500 litres of water. This is more than one person will drink for 10 years, consuming eight cups each day. 

    This is because both jeans and shirts are usually made from cotton, and it takes a lot of water to grow cotton. 

    The clothing industry also affects water purity

    Fabric dyeing is the second largest source of water pollution in the world, as the residue from the process is often dumped into ditches, streams or rivers. The dyeing process uses enough water to fill 2 million Olympic swimming pools each year….

    The list could go on, and water is just one of the factors that deteriorate as a result of our daily purchasing habits, which are not always thoughtful and conscious.

    The important thing here is to realise that changing them has the power to change the world. You can start today.


    Source:
    Business Insider